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Fast fashion: 'We're buying too much because clothes have never been cheaper'

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US actor Joaquin Phoenix made headlines at this year's Golden Globes by announcing that he'll be wearing exactly the same tuxedo to every movie awards ceremony he attends this season. We're often told that when it comes to getting dressed, we should buy less, recycle and upcycle to make our planet greener. Our Perspective guest is Dana Thomas, whose latest book "Fashionopolis: The Price of Fast Fashion and the Future of Clothes" looks at these very issues.

Added on the 13/01/2020 08:37:00 - Copyright : France 24 EN

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