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Porsche 911 GT3 (PDK) in Python Green Driving Video

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The technological progress in the area of aerodynamics is particularly apparent. It is the first time that a suspended rear wing has been fitted on a Porsche series production car. Its swan-neck mounting is used in a similar form in the GT racing car 911 RSR and the one-make cup racing car 911 GT3 Cup. Since two aluminium brackets now hold the wing element from above, the airflow can pass undisturbed across the underside, which is aerodynamically more sensitive. This new design led to a reduction in the flow losses and not only increased the downforce, but also resulted in well-balanced negative lift conditions together with many other detailed measures. “We developed the aerodynamics of the new 911 GT3 in around 700 simulations. We spent more than 160 hours fine-tuning the car in the wind tunnel,” explains aerodynamics engineer Mathias Roll.

Added on the 26/04/2021 06:45:26 - Copyright : Auto Moto EN

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