Home > EPA Says Flint, Michigan Water Is Safe Again

News
EPA Says Flint, Michigan Water Is Safe Again

Description

On June 23rd, Federal officials announced that it is now safe for anyone to drink properly filtered water in Flint, Michigan, where a public health crisis erupted after residents were exposed to dangerously high levels of lead. The Environmental Protection Agency said in a statement that the most recent testing at nearly 50 locations in the city showed lead levels far below those considered dangerous. But the city's mayor said some homes in Flint can't be fitted with filters, so bottled water is still needed. Lead can be toxic, and children are especially vulnerable.

Added on the 23/06/2016 14:05:45 - Copyright : Wochit

To customise your video :

Or Create an account

More videos on the subject

  • EPA says filtered Flint, Michigan drinking water is now safe to drink

    Thursday, Federal officials said it is safe for anyone to drink properly filtered water in Flint, Michigan, where a public health crisis erupted after residents were exposed to dangerously high levels of lead. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) said in a statement that the most recent testing at nearly 50 locations in the city showed lead levels far below the levels considered dangerous. But the city's mayor said some homes in Flint cannot be fitted with filters, so bottled water is still needed. Flint, with a population of about 100,000, was under control of a state-appointed emergency manager in 2014 when it switched its water source from Detroit's municipal system to the Flint River to save money. The city switched back in October.

    23/06/2016 - Wochit
  • Filtered Water In Flint Deemed Safe To Drink

    Lead levels in tap water in Flint, Michigan, are no longer dangerous if the water is filtered, officials said Thursday. The announcement by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) came after months of warnings that pregnant women and children under the age of 6 should stick to bottled water. Dangerously high levels of lead have been present in the city’s water since 2014, and after community outrage over inaction, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder declared a state of emergency in January. With official recognition of the crisis, residents began receiving bottled water and free filters. But lead levels in some areas were so high, it was unclear if the filters had the power to render the water safe to drink. More than 50,000 filters have been provided to residents since January, according to the EPA. Over the last two months, officials have been testing lead levels in water from across the city to determine how well the filters are working

    24/06/2016 - Wochit
  • EPA Warns Flint Of Long Term Threats To Water Supply

    The U.S. Environmental protection agency warned the city of flint faces many long-term threats to its water supply, even though short-term progress has been made in reducing lead contamination. An outline was made of At least five areas requiring additional funding and attention to ensure safe and sustainable drinking water. The outline was sent in a letter to the flint mayor and Michigan state governor. It said significant long-term challenges remain, such as the need for more money, a reliable city administration, and a decision on what Flint's long-term water source should be.

    17/06/2016 - Wochit
  • EPA Intends to Improve Safe Water Laws Amid Controversy

    The U.S. Enivronmental Protection Agency is under scrutiny over its response to the water crisis in Flint, Michigan. In response, it has announced it intends to improve its safe water laws.

    02/02/2016 - Wochit
  • EPA Admits Its Mistakes in Handling Flint Water Situation

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said on Tuesday that it is reviewing its handling of a crisis over lead-contaminated drinking water in the city of Flint, Michigan and admitted that it did not respond fast enough. The agency said in a statement, "Our first priority is to make sure the water in Flint is safe, but we also must look at what the agency could have done differently." Criticism of the state and federal response has increased in recent days over the crisis in Flint, a city of just under 100,000 residents about 60 miles northwest of Detroit. The EPA added that its oversight was hampered "by failures and resistance at the state and local levels to work with us in a forthright, transparent and proactive manner."

    20/01/2016 - Wochit
  • U.S. Supreme Court Allows Flint Water Contamination Lawsuits

    On Monday, the US Supreme Court allowed two class action lawsuits filed by residents of Flint, Michigan, who are pursuing civil rights claims against local and state officials over lead contamination in the city's water supply. The 6th Circuit decided that the civil rights claims could proceed, ruling they were not precluded by a statute that sets the standards for drinking water. In a cost-cutting move in April 2014, Flint switched its public water source from Lake Huron to the Flint River.

    19/03/2018 - Wochit
  • EPA Gives $100 Million Upgrade To Flint Water Infrastructure

    On Friday, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency said it had awarded $100 million to upgrade Flint, Michigan's drinking water infrastructure. The move is to address a crisis that exposed thousands of children to lead poisoning. The grant to the Michigan Department of Environmental Quality will enable the city to "accelerate and expand" its work to replace lead pipes and make other improvements, according to the EPA. Estimates of the upgrade's cost range from $200 million to $400 million. Friday's announcement made the disbursement official.

    17/03/2017 - Wochit