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More Birth Defects In U.S. Areas With Zika

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The mosquito-borne Zika virus that was first detected in Brazil in 2015, may be responsible for an increase in birth defects in U.S states and territories. This includes women who had no lab evidence of Zika exposure during pregnancy. Areas in which the virus has been circulating like Puerto Rico and Southern Florida saw a 21 percent rise in birth defects strongly linked with Zika. The only are where that kind of increase was found was in the jurisdictions that had local transmission.

Added on the 25/01/2018 15:48:59 - Copyright : Wochit

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